photo credit: Maria Teicher

photo credit: Maria Teicher

I was born and raised in Colorado and for awhile now call Brooklyn my home.  My figurative work is about observing people; people and their stories are fascinating to me and honest moments are fleeting. I like the idea that everyone is their own island--you can visit someone when they let you in, when they let you see them. I like to paint people I know from life and often paint myself.

My work is always in some way autobiographical.  My landscape monotypes explore my relationship to place and time. Some of the places I’ve recorded are already ingrained in me, places I’ve gone to since I was a child.  And when I go back to them as an adult I feel I can pick up with them where we left off, like old friends—a red rock formation at a certain snowy fork in the road, an old mossy tree that grew years before my time. 

If I return to a place and it has drastically changed I feel alarmed, violated.  Maybe this is why I record places that I sense may not be there when I return in a year or more—my grandmother’s house at dusk, a closed cement plant I always drove past.  Most recently the forest I played in as a child that every year is more and more changed by the effects of climate change and beetle kill.

Other landscapes I have only seen traveling through or lived briefly in, as an outsider, but I needed to remember them or maybe I needed to remember me as I was in them, so I recorded them.  And in doing so preserved what they were to me. If I never see a place again it remains the same, frozen, poeticized in my mind.